fox

I think the question I am asked more often than any other is how I transfer my design from paper to fabric.  There are very many ways of doing this, and I talk about a few of the more usual ones in my little e-book “Simple Stitchery”  (available on the free patterns page of this site).  But often people are intrigued by what appear to be graphite pencil lines (but they’re not!) on my fabric …

I use a slightly risky method to transfer my pattern – I say risky as there is the potential for damaging both self and fabric in the process  - which is why I would never recommend anyone else to try it, or at least issue the warning “do so at your own risk!”  But it does give excellent results so if you are interested, then here’s how I do it …..

When I’m creating a design like my little Friendly Fox (he’ll be in the July issue of the Bustle & Sew Magazine) I first draw him out with pen and ink, making many revisions and using plenty of tracing paper before I’m completely happy with the result.  Then I scan the image and clean up any background smudges etc using Photoshop.  Although I draw with a fine black pen, I use the colour changer tool to make sure that any lines that have scanned as a dark grey are black as this technique only works with strong black lines.  Finally I reverse the image and print a mirror image onto ordinary paper using my laser printer.

Then it’s over to the heatpress.  I set the temperature at 195oC and the timer to around 70 secs.  The fabric goes in right side up and the paper on top, right side down.  Once the fabric has cooled, then I peel off the paper – which can then be used for tracing applique shapes onto my Bondaweb as it’s a reverse image.

I find this method is great for crisp detailed transfer of images onto light coloured fabric.  It is a permanent transfer, so you have to be sure to cover the lines with your stitching/applique.  Obviously it only works with cotton, linen or cotton/linen blend light coloured fabrics and there is always the danger of scorching your fabric.

I have done many test prints in the past, and it’s taken a lot of trial and error to arrive at the above settings, which is why I wouldn’t advise anyone to simply follow my method.  But if you do have the right equipment (I don’t know if it would work with a hot iron or not, I’ve never tried) and are willing to experiment, then you could find the results are well worthwhile.

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A very clever softie in a very silly post!

by Helen on April 9, 2014

This morning as I sat at my table sewing my new top, my eye was caught by a tiny movement in the corner of my workroom ….

Who could it be?  No, not the French hens .. nor the lovebirds …  But wait – I see –  what is my little fox in a frock doing?  Let’s look a little closer ….

She’s taught herself to embroider.  What a clever fox!  What beautiful neat work!

Especially as she only has felt paws!  Well done Miss Fox.  Her vintage bluebird pattern is from an old pattern sheet with half a dozen different bluebird designs and I’ll include it in the May magazine as well as the pattern for Miss Fox.  

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Fox in a Frock and my Easter sale

by Helen on April 6, 2014

I do enjoy making softies, which means that there’s a softie pattern in almost every issue of the Bustle & Sew Magazine (I have to limit myself to just one!).  I’m busy working on the May issue now, and as an antidote to all those Easter bunnies and chicks (lovely though they are) I thought I’d create a fox.  But not your ordinary, everyday sort of fox – oh no – my little lady is a fox in a frock!

I had so much fun making her – and my overlocker came in very handy for gathering the skirt of her frock – though it’s easy to do with long machine stitching of course – I just enjoy playing with my new toy!  I’ve given her nice stripey laces on her black boots and embroidered dainty flowers on her little felt collar.  She’s actually quite a large softie for me – though very slender – measuring around 15″ tall.  Her arms and legs are jointed with strong thread and buttons so move quite freely…

Here she is nonchalantly perched on the edge of my ribbons box, casually swinging one elegantly booted paw!  You’ll find her pattern in the May issue of the Bustle & Sew Magazine – once all those spring lambs are safely out of the way!  But at the moment we’re still eagerly anticipating Easter – though chocolate is likely to be severely limited here at Coombe Leigh as wedding day diets are underway! So as a different sort of treat, I’m having a egg-stremely good (groan!) good sale here at Bustle & Sew …..

There’s 40% off everything in my store (except magazine subscriptions) until Easter, so if you were thinking of stocking up on a few projects for some holiday stitching, now is a great time to shop.  Just CLICK HERE to visit the Bustle & Sew store and don’t forget to enter code “EASTERBUNNY” at checkout to receive your egg-stra special discount. xx

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Woodland Alphabet Quilt wip

by Helen on March 5, 2014

Sometimes it feels so easy ….  I’m sure you know what I mean …. those rare occasions that you have an idea and translating it into fabric and thread just flows, everything happens right the first time.  It’s such a magic, wonderful feeling that for me at least, happens only rarely – usually I can be found muttering, unpicking, tweaking and re-stitching!  But there was no unpicking at all while I was stitching this project – my Woodland Alphabet Quilt …

It’s destined to be a gift for some friends who have been waiting for adoption for some time.  They’ve recently heard that they’ll be bringing home a little boy aged seven months in just a few weeks time.  I do hope they’ll like my gift…

It’s still very much a work in progress, but I finished piecing the top late this afternoon – just some borders around the edges and it’s onto the quilting.  I was inspired by the clean lines and appliqued text of the Baby Life Quilt design by V and Co that I found in the Moda Bakeshop

I love the uncluttered feel of this quilt and wanted to try to give my Woodland Alphabet Quilt the same feeling of simplicity and space – as well as including lots of  forest friends ….

 

I followed Vanessa Christenson’s tip of zig-zagging around my applique shapes with clear thread.  All my shapes were quite simple so there wasn’t too much huffing and puffing while pivoting around corners.  My favourite block is R for Rabbit (of course!) …. 

Though the hedgehog and mouse are cute too.  I’m considering whether to add a narrow patchwork border around all the squares before the final wider borders – if anybody has any thoughts or suggestions I’d love to hear them.  This project will be included in the April issue of the Bustle & Sew eMagazine and then I’ll be wrapping it up ready to send to my friends in time for their baby boy’s arrival.  

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